What’s wrong with “Like”

I’ll admit it, I’m an anti-like evangelista.

My students all learn that it is a pet peeve of mine to begin a critique with, “I like…” Not only is it unproductive, but it makes the critique personal, and that’s often not helpful. Overuse of like makes for lazy critiques.

Helping students to learn that although we may enter the conversation based on our personal attraction (or repulsion to) an art work, for the conversation to be useful to the maker (and to the rest of us) we need to delve beyond that personal attraction and explore what makes the work successful (or unsuccessful).

My classes may laugh about my seemingly futile attempts to get students to drop this use of like, but I do make a concerted attempt to get the students to find different ways of approaching the subject such as: “I respond to that work because….” It’s the because that is important. If we don’t strive to explain why we respond the way we do, then critique becomes merely an exercise in personal preference.

Ask your students to exercise their minds and go a little deeper when undertaking the critique process.

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This entry was posted in Actively Engaging Students in Classroom, Critique, Evaluating Student Work and tagged , , by seszucs. Bookmark the permalink.

About seszucs

Suzanne E. Szucs is an artist, writer and educator living and working in Rochester, MN. A recipient of numerous grants and awards, including an Illinois Arts Council Individual Fellowship and a Minnesota State Arts Board Individual Artist Grant, Szucs has shown her work widely. To see portfolios or link to articles go to: www.suzanneszucs.com or mnartists.org Szucs has a BFA from the San Francisco Art Institute and a MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Having taught since 1995, Szucs has held positions at a variety of institutions, from adjunct positions at art schools and community colleges, multi-year positions at two universities and is currently a full-time Instructor of Art, Photography at Rochester Community & Technical College. Her experience includes teaching across the spectrum of photographic practice and history and working with diverse demographics of students at both the undergraduate and graduate level.

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